Category: Uncategorized

Waktunya Tambah Kosakata Gaul “Jein”

Waktunya Tambah Kosataka Gaul~ 🕵️
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Ada yang sudah tau atau sering dengar kata “Jein” dalam bahasa Jerman ?? hmmm kira-kira apanya artinya??
Berikut adalah penggunaan kata “Jein” dalam bahasa Jerman 😉


Kosakata gaul apa lagi yang kamu tahu dalam bahasa Jerman?? tulis di kolom komentar ya 😉
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—– 🏠🏠🏠 —–
GATE Language Assistant
Jln. Bengawan No. 69 Lantai 3 Bandung
Phone/ WA : 081 3838 88 520

Waktunya Tambah Kosakata Gaul “Na?”

Waktunya Tambah Kosataka Gaul~ 🕵️
.
Ada yang sudah tau atau sering dengar kata “Na?” dalam bahasa Jerman ?? hmmm kira-kira apanya artinya??
Berikut adalah penggunaan kata “Na?” dalam bahasa Jerman 😉

Kosakata gaul apa lagi yang kamu tahu dalam bahasa Jerman?? tulis di kolom komentar ya 😉
.
—– 🏠🏠🏠 —–
GATE Language Assistant
Jln. Bengawan No. 69 Lantai 3 Bandung
Phone/ WA : 081 3838 88 520

BEASISWA S2 CHEVENING

Ada lagi nih satu program beasiswa keren yang layak diperjuangkan: Chevening Sholarship Programme. Chevening adalah program beasiswa yang diberikan oleh Pemerintah United Kingdom untuk memperoleh gelar Master atau S2 lewat satu tahun perkuliahan di UK. Kelebihan utama Chevening Sholarship Programme adalah memberikan beasiswa penuh sehingga penerima beasiswa bisa fokus ke perkuliahannya dan menikmati pengalaman berharga kuliah di UK. Selain itu, penerima beasiswa Chevening akan tinggal dan belajar selama satu tahun di UK, sebuah peluang emas yang bisa dimanfaatkan untuk banyak hal selain memperoleh gelar Master. Misalnya, waktu satu tahun tinggal di UK bisa digunakan untuk membangun jaringan, mengalami dan memahami budaya UK secara langsung, dan mengembangkan hubungan baik dengan UK. Hal-hal ini tentunya sangat bermanfaat untuk perkembangan diri, baik secara akademis maupun profesional.

Apa saja sih yang perlu disiapkan untuk mengajukan diri sebagai penerima beasiswa Chevening? Mereka yang berhak menerima beasiswa Chevening harus memenuhi persyaratan berikut:

  • Warga negara yang terdaftar dalam program beasiswa Chevening. Indonesia termasuk salah satu negara yang warga negaranya berhak menerima beasiswa Chevening, jadi kalau kamu warga negara Indonesia, kamu boleh mendaftar program ini.
  • Setelah menerima beasiswa Chevening dan belajar selama satu tahun di UK, penerima beasiswa wajib kembali ke negara asalnya dan tinggal selama dua tahun di kampung halaman.
  • Tentunya pelamar program beasiswa Chevening harus memiliki gelar setara S1, sebab beasiswa Chevening diberikan untuk perkuliahan tingkat Master (S2).
  • Memiliki pengalaman kerja selama minimal 2 tahun (atau setara 2.800 jam kerja).
  • Melamar ke tiga universitas UK berbeda yang terdaftar dalam program Chevening dan harus memperoleh penawaran kuliah tanpa syarat (pemberitahuan diterima) dari salah satu universitas tersebut paling lambat tanggal 15 Juli 2021.
  • Memenuhi persyaratan Kemampuan Berbahasa Inggris yang ditentukan oleh program beasiswa Chevening per tanggal 15 Juli 2021.

Jika kamu sudah memenuhi syarat kelayakan di atas, kamu bisa deh mengirimkan lamaranmu beserta dokumen-dokumen persyaratan yang diperlukan. Dokumen yang perlu kamu persiapkan antara lain:

  • Esai yang menjelaskan kenapa kamu ingin atau harus memperoleh gelar Master dengan kuliah di UK,
  • Esai yang menjelaskan pengalaman kepemimpinan,
  • Esai yang menjabarkan rencana karir setelah mengikuti program beasiswa,
  • Rujukan dari dua orang terpercaya yang mengenalmu dalam konteks profesional atau akademik. Rujukan yang mereka berikan harus menjelaskan secara umum kenapa kamu layak menerima beasiswa Chevening,
  • Hasil tes Bahasa Inggris.

Untuk hasil tes bahasa, Program beasiswa Chevening hanya menerima bukti kemampuan berbahasa Inggris dari sejumlah penyedia tes Bahasa Inggris. Jadi pastikan bukti kemampuan berbahasa Inggris yang kamu berikan diperoleh dari salah satu tes berikut:

  • Academic IELTS minimal 6.5
  • TOEFL IBT minimal 79
  • Pearson PTE Academic
  • C1 Advanced (dulu disebut Cambridge English: Advanced [CAE])
  • Trinity ISE II (B2)

Kalau kamu sudah memenuhi syarat kelayakan dan sudah menyiapkan semua dokumen persyaratan, kamu bisa mengirimkan lamaran mulai tanggal 3 September 2020 secara daring. Jangan lupa, penerimaan lamaran ini akan ditutup tanggal 3 November 2020, ya. Ayo, persiapkan diri. Peluang kuliah di UK selama satu tahun dengan beasiswa penuh terlalu manis untuk dilewatkan begitu saja. ^^

GATE Language Assistant membuka program asistensi untuk program beasiswa Chevening ini lho. Kami siap mendampingi mulai dari pengisian dokumen, proofread essay (kosakata, konten, dan grammar), hingga pemilihan kampus sesuai dengan bidang kalian. Sooo– masih ada waktu buat persiapan bareng GATE Language Assistant nih. Seru kaaan– Info lebih lanjut bisa langsung hubungi kami ya ^^

Informasi lebih lanjut mengenai program beasiswa Chevening bisa dilihat di www.chevening.org/scholarship/indonesia/

Dapatkan Harga Special!

Mau kursus bahasa asing di GATE Language Assistant??~

Sssttt~ ternyata ada caranya biar dapet harga special loohhh~

Dengan mengajak teman untuk kursus bersama, kamu bisa dapetin harga special dari kita!~

Tentunya kursus bersama teman akan lebih seru dong~ mau kursus bahasa apa?? Arab, Jerman, Inggris, Korea, Jepang, Mandarin atau kelas persiapan ujian bahasa?? semuanya bisaaa~

yukkk buruan daftar dan ajak temanmu sebanyak-banyaknya! 😉

What Can Communities Do to Help Themselves?

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Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.

Share What You’ve Learnt

Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

– james jackson

It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.

Make Yourself Accountable

Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”

Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.


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There are no secrets to success. It is the result of hard work.

- james jackson

Find Your Next Course Faster: Search By Skill

Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.

Share What You’ve Learnt

Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

– james jackson

It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.

Make Yourself Accountable

Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”

Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.

Helping Great Answers Stand Out In Discussion Forums

Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.

Share What You’ve Learnt

Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

– james jackson

It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.

Make Yourself Accountable

Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”

Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.

Get the Skills to Communicate Your Ideas Visually

iGuru’s Transition To A New Technology Platform

Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.

Share What You’ve Learnt

Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

– james jackson

It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.

Make Yourself Accountable

Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”

Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.

How to Craft the Perfect UI/UX Design

Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.

Share What You’ve Learnt

Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

– james jackson

It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.

Make Yourself Accountable

Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”

Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.

5 More Tips & Tools for Social Learning

Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.

Share What You’ve Learnt

Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

– james jackson

It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.

Make Yourself Accountable

Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”

Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.

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